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Proton clinicians are setting sights on Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas

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Lymphomas are the new targets for protons. Primarily preferred for treating solid mass tumors, protons are now being viewed as a prudent type of radiation for treating Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas. About 9,000 Americans are diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma every year. And more than 65,ooo Americans are diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma annually. According to Brad Hoppe, M.D., M.P.H, a radiation oncologist at the University of Florida College of Medicine in Jacksonville, Florida, the combination of chemotherapy and conventional radiation has dramatically increased survivorship for lymphoma patients. “People go on to live for decades,” he says. “And then we see late complications from their treatment, such as secondary cancers and cardiac complications that end their... Full article

Hodgkin lymphoma study shows prospect of long-term benefits of proton therapy

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Smaller amounts of spillover radiation to healthy tissue and organs have heightened interest in using protons to treat Hodgkin lymphoma.   In the first-of-its-kind study, prospectively comparing radiation dose to normal tissue for involved-node proton therapy with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in Hodgkin lymphoma patients, the mean dose of... Full article

Study looks at value vs. cost in proton and X-ray therapy delivery

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A proof of concept study from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center shows that the episodic cost of care using intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in advanced-stage head and neck cancer is less than that of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), also known as X-ray or photon therapy. The study, “Defining the Value of Proton Therapy,” published in Oncology Payers, detailed findings concerning... Full article

Florida’s 5-year outcomes study of prostate cancer patients surprised some radiation oncologists

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Results of the first five-year outcomes study of prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided proton beams have generated some surprise among radiation oncologists not affiliated with a proton therapy center.   “I have had emails from a number of people who have not been involved in proton therapy who were asking for an explanation,” said Nancy P. Mendenhall, M.D., lead author of the peer-reviewed... Full article

WEB REVIEW – PT better than IMRT for head & neck cancer

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Proton beam therapy (PT) has a significant advantage over intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) when it comes to improving disease-free survival and tumor control in patients with head and neck cancers according to a study by Mayo Clinic radiation oncologists. The study was published in Lancet Oncology and involved a systematic review of the literature on outcomes of proton beam therapy compared to IMRT. The... Full article

Fewer side effects lead patients with head and neck cancers to protons

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Proton radiation oncologists continue to be optimistic about the early results they are seeing in treating head and neck cancers. In the Czech Republic, a leading radiation oncologist reports that patients there who have been treated for head and neck cancers with protons are experiencing far fewer side effects than those typically experienced by photon radiation patients. “Protons have huge benefits,” says Dr.... Full article

Early Evidence Suggests Proton Therapy Offers Safe, Long-Term Treatment for Hodgkin Lymphoma

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Despite some success in treating patients with Hodgkin lymphoma, many patients suffer from late effects of radiation therapy and chemotherapy treatment, including the possible onset of breast cancer or heart disease.   A study by the University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute shows that the use of proton therapy following chemotherapy in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma has a success rate similar to the conventional... Full article

5 years after proton beam therapy, most prostate cancer patients are disease-free and living a normal life, study reports

According to Dr Mendenhall, the number of cancer-free men previously diagnosed with mid-level prostate cancer is of particular significance
A long-term outcomes study of prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided protons may begin to dispel questions about the efficacy of proton therapy and its impact on patient quality of life. For five years, clinicians at the University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute in Jacksonville, Florida, tracked the ongoing health of 211 men. Each had been diagnosed with low-, intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer.... Full article

Some lung cancers may see benefits from few larger daily doses of protons

Dr Daniel Gome
Higher doses of proton beam radiation may be a worthwhile treatment alternative for some lung cancer patients.   Radiation oncologists at MD Anderson Cancer Center and MD Anderson Proton Therapy Center in Houston, Texas, are taking a lead in evaluating the use of fewer, larger-sized fractions of a total proton dose to treat early and more advanced lung cancers. This clinical approach is called hypofractionated... Full article

Study shows proton therapy cuts risk of secondary tumors nearly in half compared to photon radiation

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A study published in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics has shown that proton therapy reduces the risk of a patient developing a second tumor by nearly half as compared with conventional radiation (photon) therapy. The impetus for doing the study was to see if the improved dose distribution achievable with protons as compared with photons would translate into a reduced rate for... Full article

Secondary and recurrent cancers may be good candidates for protons

Anita Mahajan, MD, medical director at MD Anderson Proton Center in Houston, Texas.
For cancer survivors, cancer’s return can be a sudden, agonizing punch to the gut. And that’s especially true for patients whose cancer develops in the same area where the first cancer had been successfully treated with radiation. Physicians have a harder time using photon treatments a second time. They don’t want inadvertent radiation to re-injure adjacent tissues and organs — over and above the... Full article
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